Katzenberg denies crude remarks about Molly Ringwald

  • Jeffrey Katzenberg ardently denied making  crude remarks about Molly Ringwald in a 1995 issue of Movieline
  • In the issue he's quoted saying 'I wouldn't know [Ringwald] if she sat on my face'
  • He issued a statement Tuesday saying he would never have said that
  • The issue came to light when Ringwald penned an essay in the New Yorker about her own experiences with sexual harassment in Hollywood 

By Abigail Miller For Dailymail.com

Published: 00:58 EDT, 18 October 2017 | Updated: 01:14 EDT, 18 October 2017

Jeffrey Katzenberg has been forced to defend himself after being accused of making a crude comment about '80s darling Molly Ringwald in the 1990s. 

On Tuesday Ringwald penned an essay in the New Yorker, reflecting on her own experiences with sexual harassment in Hollywood, following in the footsteps of many fellow actresses who have detailed assault at the hands of fallen-mogul Harvey Weinstein. 

The 49-year-old spoke about how she experienced harassment as early as 13 years old, when a fifty-year-old crew member said he would teach her to dance, 'and then proceeded to push against me with an erection.' 

A year later, she said, a married director stuck his tongue down her throat while on set. 

And when she was in her twenties, she details how she was 'blindsided' when she was asked to let a lead actor put a dog collar around her neck.

Jeffrey Katzenberg has been forced to defend himself after being accused of making a crude comment about '80s darling Molly Ringwald in the 1990s. She is pictured in 1987 at the 59th annual Academy Awards
Jeffrey Katzenberg has been forced to defend himself after being accused of making a crude comment about '80s darling Molly Ringwald in the 1990s. She is pictured in 1987 at the 59th annual Academy Awards
On Tuesday Ringwald penned an essay in the New Yorker , reflecting on her own experiences with sexual harassment in Hollywood, following in the footsteps of many fellow actresses who have detailed assault at the hands of fallen-mogul Harvey Weinstein. She is pictured in 1985
On Tuesday Ringwald penned an essay in the New Yorker , reflecting on her own experiences with sexual harassment in Hollywood, following in the footsteps of many fellow actresses who have detailed assault at the hands of fallen-mogul Harvey Weinstein. She is pictured in 1985

Molly Ringwald penned an essay in the New Yorker Tuesday, reflecting on her experiences with sexual harassment in Hollywood, following the recent Harvey Weinstein sexual assault allegations. She is pictured left in the 

In response to being quoted as making a crude remark to the actress in 1995, Jeffrey Katzenberg ardently denied ever making the comment before apologizing to the actress. He is pictured with Harvey Weinstein, who he referred to as a 'monster' over the sexual assault allegations
In response to being quoted as making a crude remark to the actress in 1995, Jeffrey Katzenberg ardently denied ever making the comment before apologizing to the actress. He is pictured with Harvey Weinstein, who he referred to as a 'monster' over the sexual assault allegations

In response to being quoted as making a crude remark to the actress in 1995, Jeffrey Katzenberg ardently denied ever making the comment before apologizing to the actress. He is pictured with Harvey Weinstein, who he referred to as a 'monster' over the sexual assault allegations

After that happened she moved to Paris to get away from the acting scene in the United States and put her career 'on the back burner.' 

When the magazine Movieline decided to feature Ringwald on their cover in 1995, 'the head of a major studio - and, incidentally, someone who claims himself to be horrified by the Harvey allegations' was quoted saying: 'I wouldn't know [Molly Ringwald] if she sat on my face.'

That studio head was later alleged to be Jeffrey Katzenberg by a number of outlets, linking to the magazine issue.  

In response to it, Molly wrote: 'Maybe he was misquoted. If he ever sent a note of apology, it must have gotten lost in the mail.'

On Tuesday night Katzenberg responded to the allegation in a statement to The Hollywood reporter - saying that he is horrified someone would attribute that quote to him. 

The 49-year-old spoke about how she experienced harassment as early as 13 years old, when a fifty-year-old crew member said he would teach her to dance, 'and then proceeded to push against me with an erection.' Ringwald is pictured in May 2017
The 49-year-old spoke about how she experienced harassment as early as 13 years old, when a fifty-year-old crew member said he would teach her to dance, 'and then proceeded to push against me with an erection.' Ringwald is pictured in May 2017

The 49-year-old spoke about how she experienced harassment as early as 13 years old, when a fifty-year-old crew member said he would teach her to dance, 'and then proceeded to push against me with an erection.' Ringwald is pictured in May 2017

'That Molly Ringwald had to read those words attributed to me and believe I said them is horrifying, mortifying and embarrassing to me,' the 66-year-old said. 

'Anyone who knows me now or back then knows I do not use language like that as a matter of course, or tolerate it. 

'Ms Ringwald, 22 years too late, I am deeply, deeply sorry.' 

Ringwald, who is currently portraying Archie Andrews' mom in the CW television show Riverdale, said in the op-ed: 'I could go on about other instances in which I have felt demeaned or exploited, but I fear it would get repetitive. Then again, that's part of the point.'

She also spoke about working with Weinstein at the start of his career in 1990 on the movie Strike It Rich. 

At the time she was 20, and said that although she was warned about him from some other actresses, she didn't have any overwhelmingly negative experiences with him herself. 

She did, though, later sue him for being denied her gross percentage of the film- and never worked with the Weinstein brothers again.

Katzenberg, who is the former chairman of Walt Disney Studios and former CEO of DreamWorks Animation - previously told the Hollywood Reporter he was 'paralyzed' when Weinstein asked he and a group of other executives to publicly vouch for him ahead of being fired from The Weinstein Company. 

He also repudiated his former colleague at a Wall Street Journal Conference in Laguna Beach, calling him a 'monster' for his alleged crimes against women. 

'Make no mistake about it: he is a monster,' Katzenberg said on Monday night.

But, he pressed on that Weinstein couldn't have acted alone, calling the group of people who protected the disgraced mogul 'a pack of wolves.'  

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