Home | NEWS | Peanut patch DOES cure allergy, major study insists
❰❰ Michigan coach 'was texting and driving' during crash
Iraq veteran describes 15 years of addiction ❱❱

Peanut patch DOES cure allergy, major study insists

  • The Viaskin peanut skin patch increased resilience 10-fold compared to a placebo in a phase 2b trial, a new study claims
  • The patch gradually exposes patients to the proteins that trigger a reaction
  • Last month, a study said the patch worked no better than a placebo in kids
  • But this study says it is more effective if it administers a high dose of the protein 

By Mia De Graaf For Dailymail.com

Published: 15:13 EST, 14 November 2017 | Updated: 15:18 EST, 14 November 2017

A simple patch could cure life-threatening peanut allergies, new research claims.

Viaskin Peanut is a stick-on band designed to gradually expose patients to the proteins that give them an allergic reaction.

Last month, the so-called 'vaccine' failed in a large clinical trial, faring no better than a placebo.

However, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York insists it should not be ruled out just yet, since their trial found the patch left patients 10 times more resilient. 

Viaskin Peanut is a stick-on band designed to gradually expose patients to the protein that give them an allergic reaction. A new study found it increases resilience 10-fold
Viaskin Peanut is a stick-on band designed to gradually expose patients to the protein that give them an allergic reaction. A new study found it increases resilience 10-fold

Viaskin Peanut is a stick-on band designed to gradually expose patients to the protein that give them an allergic reaction. A new study found it increases resilience 10-fold

The phase 2b trial - one of the latest stages before it can be approved for the market - involved 221 people with peanut allergies aged between six and 55 years old.

For two years, a quarter of the patients were treated with a placebo, while the other three-quarters received one of three strengths of the skin patch.

They were assessed every 12 months by receiving incremental doses of peanut to monitor their reaction.

Those who received the strongest patch were 10 times more resilient than those who received the placebo, according to the report published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) today.

There was no difference between the placebo and the two weaker strengths.

Lead author Dr Hugh Sampson said the results show that the patch is effective if it administers a high dose, despite fears that it flopped in previous trials. 

Last month, a report revealed the patch was no more effective for 300 child patients than a placebo.  

However, manufacturer DBV Technologies, who plan to trade the patch under the name Viaskin, already had Dr Sampson's data and insisted they still planned to move towards filing for FDA approval. 

A spokesman said the FDA even encouraged them to proceed with trials and applications based on provisional data. 


Article Tags

    No tags for this article

About the author

Subscribe to comments feed Comments (0 posted)

total: | displaying:

Post your comment

  • Bold
  • Italic
  • Underline
  • Quote

Please enter the code you see in the image:

Captcha
What's next